Doris Day

This is Biography Doris Day Born Doris von Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 3 April 1922, the beautiful and sweet Doris Day had already achieved a certain notoriety as a singer before her film debut, thanks to director Michael Curtiz who wrote her for his musical ‘Romance on the High Seas’ (1948).Doris Day has portrayed on the screen the image of the clean-cut girl, sweet and sensitive, gently witty and with good morals. What one might commonly call the true ‘girl next door’.

Blonde and with a dazzling smile, Doris went from appearing in supporting roles – as a typical ‘girl next door’ – in musicals, to starring in numerous films modelled on her character.

Despite her ability as a brilliant actress, she is generally sought after for her remarkable singing skills. Her performances were considered the highlight in most of her films. Among them, “Don’t Shoot, Kiss Me!” (Calamity Jane, 1953) by David Butler, “Love Me or Leave Me” (1955) by Charles Vidor, “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956) by Alfred Hitchcock, a disturbing thriller in which she also sings the famous theme song “Que sera sera” by Jay Livingstone, and “The Pajama Game” (1957) by Stanley Donen are probably her best performances.

Despite her ability as a brilliant actress, she is generally sought after for her remarkable singing skills. Her performances were considered the highlight in most of her films. Among them, “Don’t Shoot, Kiss Me!” (Calamity Jane, 1953) by David Butler, “Love Me or Leave Me” (1955) by Charles Vidor, “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1956) by Alfred Hitchcock, a disturbing thriller in which she also sings the famous theme song “Que sera sera” by Jay Livingstone, and “The Pajama Game” (1957) by Stanley Donen are probably her best performances.

Doris Day’s records are among the earliest examples of popular pop music, and she was a role model for many teenagers. With her healthy, vivacious appearance, full of energy and completely devoid of sophistication, Day was to be a true icon of optimism, representing the model of the enterprising and jovial American woman of the post-war period.

Her career would be particularly rich in the late 1950s and early 1960s, when a series of comedies with strong allusive connotations, such as Michael Gordon’s Pillow Talk (1959), Lover Come Back (1961) and Lover Come Back (1961), were produced. Lover Come Back (1961) and That Touch of Mink (1962), both by Delbert Mann, and Norman Jewison’s The Thrill of It All (1963), in which she sometimes appeared alongside Rock Hudson, were accepted by the public precisely because of the ‘morality’ of her image. But it is precisely this image of ‘purity’ that will contribute to her decline, due to the sexual liberation of the late 1960s.

In 1968, after the death of her husband, Doris Day discovered that he had taken advantage of his condition by giving away her entire fortune. She began working in television productions, never to appear on film again, and devoted herself mainly to caring for abandoned animals in California, where she founded the “Doris Day Animal League” based in Carmel.

Discography

1949: You’re My Thrill

1950: Young Man with a Horn

1950: Tea for Two

1951: Lullaby of Broadway

1951: On Moonlight Bay

1951: I’ll See You in My Dreams

1953: By the Light of the Silvery Moon

1953: Calamity Jane

1954: Young at Heart

1955: Love Me or Leave Me

1955: Day Dreams

1956: Day by Day

1957: The Pajama Game

1957: Day by Night

1958: Hooray for Hollywood

1959: Cuttin’ Capers

1960: What Every Girl Should Know

1960: Show Time

1961: Bright and Shiny

1961: I Have Dreamed

1962: Duet

1962: You’ll Never Walk Alone

1962: Billy Rose’s Jumbo

1963: Annie Get Your Gun

1963: Love Him

1964: The Doris Day Christmas Album

1964: With a Smile and a Song

1965: Latin for Lovers

1965: Doris Day’s Sentimental Journey

1994: The Love Album

2011: My Heart

Official website

Photo Gallery

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